Searching for Colour in Winter – Staghorn Sumac

I was pleasantly surprised recently to discover that Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) is native to my part of the world.  There’s so much of it around here I just assumed it, like all the despicable buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), was introduced.   The University of Guelph can provide a lot of information about this small tree, and it has a lot of positive traits, including providing food for birds.  My favourite thing about Sumac is the leaf colour in autumn and how the flowers turn and stay such a brilliant scarlet all winter.  It realy is nature’s perfect antidote to an otherwise grey and white season.

Sumac Jan 14 2018

3 Comments

  1. Sumac was one of the few colorful plants I remember from Oklahoma. Most of the colorful foliage was gone by the time we got there, and the remaining blackjack oak foliage was just brown.

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      1. There are several oaks in my region, each with different personalities. The coast live oak is the most variable. It grows up high and irregular with friends in a forest as easily as it grows low, broad and massive as an individual tree out in a field. I remember blackjack oak because it was the same and only oak for miles at a time. Unlike our oaks that have small range distribution, blackjack oak inhabits a huge range

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