In a Vase, on Monday – late summer white and yellow (and reds)

I walked around the garden yesterday morning, secateurs in hand, wondering what on earth might fill a vase that a) wasn’t half shriveled by drought (here’s looking at you, Rudbeckia!) b) wouldn’t drop a ton of pollen on the table (still love ya, sunflowers…) and c) I haven’t already displayed, at least too many times (hmmm..can you ever see too many Zinnias?). This is what I ended up with:

Goldenrod (Solidago sp) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium), growing wild in the yard and not terribly bothered by the lack of rain over the past six weeks, plus a few red-hued Zinnia for a splash of colour. The yellow and white combo almost makes it look like a spring arrangement, doesn’t it?

All I could hear, while looking for a spot to photograph the arrangement, was the buzzing of bees having a morning cup of nectar from nearby sunflowers and Sedum:

There’s goldenrod all over the place here in fields, along the sides of roads, edging the yard. I love it, and encourage a few patches in strategic spots within the garden beds themselves. Adds a great touch of cheeriness to a gardening season nearing its end. Here’s the patch I raided for today’s vase – it’s about seven metres from the front door and adds a nice bit of perspective when looking out at the front yard.

If you’re interested in cut flowers or flower arrangements, check out Cathy’s blog – Rambling in the Garden. She hosts this weekly theme. Thanks Cathy!

16 Comments

  1. Chris, the achillea and goldenrod make a perfect vase this week, and you know I still using zinnias as long as possible too. Sorry you’re still experiencing drought. The coast had rain when Dorian hit North Carolina but actually very little came to my garden.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. The native goldenrod is rare and docile. Garden varieties became avilable only recently, and there is still some concern that it can naturalize and become a weed. (Those who sell it do not seem to be concerned.)

        Liked by 1 person

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